Average cost of painting the exterior of your home

Unlike interior painting, an exterior painting quote is dependent on a limited number of factors.  In this article, we explain our price formula which has been fine tuned over the last decade and proven to produce the most satisfied clients, as well as sustain ELEGANT PAINTING® as a successful local employer.


#1 factor: condition of current paint

removing loose paint from wood sidingAllowing paint to chip and peel before requesting the services of a professional painter comes with two complications;

1) Increased labor costs Removing loose paint is costly.  Peeling layers must be manually removed and primer must be hand painted to ensure proper adhesion.  This is old fashioned manual labor and it will cost you.

2) Decreased durability.  Once your current coat of paint stops being protective, your substrate begins to deteriorate.  Even with proper preparation you still run the risk of the new paint job failing prematurely.  You also run the risk of ending up with a painting company that does not perform a proper preparation service.


#2 factor: Height

A three story house will always cost more to paint.  Roofing, gutter cleaning and window cleaning will all cost more if you own a three story house.  Another factor is the amount of trim to be painted on your three story house.


#3 factor: Roof pitch

If there are surfaces only reached by walking on the roof, then the pitch of your roof comes into question. Most Northwest homes have roof pitch of bellow 12/12 which can be walked on with OSHA approved safety gear.  Roof pitch 12/12 (not common) cannot be walked on and require ladder hooks.


#4 factor: Slope of your lot

Has your home been built on a steep slopes?  Most homes are on semi-level lots and are easily painted using ladder leveler.  We have encountered a few dozen projects where a ladder-trench had to be dug in order to secure our ladder legs.


#1 factor: Siding type

There are only a few common siding types on Northwest homes

back brushing cedar siding1) Beveled cedar siding.  The most common type of siding used on homes constructed prior to the 1990’s.  While this material is still in use, it has been widely replaced with Hardie Board siding.  You can expect to pay a bit more to paint your house if you have rough-cut cedar siding.  The roughness of this surface is what makes it a durable product as it holds on lots of paint and also cools down faster.  Back-rolling or back-brushing is an absolute must with this type of siding.  Paint must be pushed into the texture to ensure a strong bond.

2) Hardie board siding.  Used on nearly all new homes, this material is easy to maintain, fairly inexpensive to paint, and it holds on to paint for many years.  It is crucial that Hardie Board siding is painted using spray & back-roll method to ensure enhanced adhesion and an even spread of paint.

3)Tongue and groove siding.  Less common cedar siding that general costs more to paint d

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